9 Winter Energy Saving Tips to Save You Money

winter energy saving tips

9 Winter Energy Saving Tips to Save You Money

Whether it’s March, June, or October, one thing never changes: winter is always ahead. You have to stay warm to stay comfortable, but for a lot of people, that means paying a higher energy bill.

The average 3-4 bedroom house pays 49 pounds per month for electricity and 48 per month for gas. Dual fuel customers pay around 97 pounds per month.

But what if you didn’t have to pay that much? What if you could save money by using a few easy winter energy saving tips?

Interested? Well, who wouldn’t be? Use these nine tips, and you’ll have the warm feeling of a comfortable house and a full wallet.

Turn Down the Thermostat

I know it seems counterintuitive. You’re cold. Why not turn the heat up and make the room warmer?

Well, the room would be warmer at a higher temperature. But that higher temperature requires more work from your heating system. It has to use more gas and more electricity, translating to higher energy bills for you.

Keep your rooms at the temperature you would in normal weather. If you’re comfortable at 20 degrees, keep it there.

If you like it at 23 degrees, maybe turn it down a bit. For every degree, you dial back; you could save about 75 pounds per year.

Invest in Ceiling Fans

By now, you might think I’m crazy. While it’s true fans can help keep things cool in the summer, they also redistribute heat in the winter. It works even better if you have a house with high ceilings.

See, warm air rises. It often gets trapped at the ceiling, forcing you to turn up the heat. A ceiling fan, with the blades spinning counter-clockwise, will push that air back down.

Use an Electric Radiator

An electric radiator may not have the size or power of its contemporaries, but it will keep your heating costs low. Plus, it’s easier to operate than you might think.

You control the temperature in the room it occupies. That way, you don’t waste energy. It takes up less space than traditional radiators, with fewer emissions too.

You stay warm, go green, and save money. What’s not to like?

Take Advantage of the Sun

During the day, when the sun’s out and blazing, take advantage of it. Throw open the curtains and let the natural light warm your home.

You won’t have to use the heater as much, nor will you have to keep the lights on. Both will save you on your electric bill.

When it gets dark, pull the drapes and cover the windows. For drafty windows, consider quilted curtains. Their thicker fabric will help keep the warm air from escaping.

Check the Attic

The attic is a trouble spot when it comes to heating. If it’s under-insulated or has leaks, it gives the warm air in your home an easy out. Older homes tend to have this problem the most.

You can check with the local building inspector for the recommended level of insulation. Then, poke your head in your own attic and compare.

If you need to add more, use loose-fill insulation as opposed to fiberglass. It’ll get into the crevices and seal in all the heat.

Find and Seal Other Air Leaks

The attic isn’t the only place warm air can escape. Windows and doors can prove troublesome too, as can ductwork.

You can seal loose frames with a bit of caulk. A professional can inspect air ducts to spot leaks, then patch them or replace the whole unit if need be. He or she can also do an energy audit on the rest of your home to find other trouble spots.

Control the Humidity

Most homes require around 30-60% humidity to remain comfortable. Below that range, the air becomes drier, and you need to increase the thermostat. If you can control the humidity, you won’t have to jack up your heater or your energy bill.

To maintain humidity levels, invest in a humidifier. It’ll put water vapor back into the air, keeping it nice and toasty.

Don’t Let the Fireplace Take Away the Heat

Fireplaces may seem an energy efficient way to heat your home, and they are. The problem is they also provide that heat an escape avenue: the chimney.

If you have a modern fireplace, install an airtight. It has gaskets that seal it and keep warm air in the room.

Older model fireplaces should use a door with operable vents. The vents should only be open when the fireplace is in use. Otherwise, it’ll suck the air right out of your home.

What if you don’t have a fireplace? Well, you should skip down to our next step.

Don’t Fall For the Myths

For all the tricks out there to save energy, there are just as many myths. If you fall for them, you could end up spending a bunch of money for nothing.

Replace Your Windows

While installing storm windows and doors will keep air in, replacing every window in your home isn’t a good investment, at least in the short term.

It takes almost two decades for a new window to pay for itself. It only increases for each window your home has.

Open Doors to Let Air Circulate

I know we’ve had a couple of tips that seemed counterintuitive. This one is.

Through convection, warm air circulates on its own throughout your home. Moreover, you only need to heat the rooms you are in. Opening the doors would just let all that warm air out.

Exterior Caulking Seals Leaks the Best

You do most of the caulking to seal air leaks inside. Exterior caulking works better for keeping out water.

Where to Find More Winter Energy Saving Tips

Winter is a beautiful time of year. Kids play in the snow. Santa brings presents at Christmas, and we celebrate the coming of a new year.

Why ruin the fun overpaying your energy bills? If you follow our winter energy saving tips, you’ll lower your costs, allowing you to enjoy the season in warmth and comfort.

And if you need more home heating guides or you want a closer look at electric radiators, check out our blog. We have comprehensive guides on everything you could ask for. Log on today!

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